Tottenham: Growth after 1850

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Tottenham development from the mid-19th century
Tottenham development from the mid-19th century

"The arrival of the Northern and Eastern railway in 1840 did not markedly improve communications with London, nor did new centres of population arise around the first stations, east of Tottenham Hale and near Asplins Farm. (fn. 95) The situation of the stations, however, was responsible for buildings spreading eastward from High Road. By 1863 Tottenham Hale had been joined to the village around the high cross by buildings along the south side of High Cross Lane, while terraces lined part of the new Somerset and Chesnut roads a little to the north; Stamford and Markfield roads had been laid out east of Page Green, where 84 small building plots had been offered for sale ten years earlier, (fn. 96) although a stretch of Broad Lane still approached Tottenham Hale through fields. Farther north near Park station there were houses along part of Marsh and Willoughby lanes, where St. Paul's church had been built and Willoughby House had been demolished in 1858, (fn. 97) and many middle-class villas along a new link between the railway and High Road, called Northumberland Park. Tottenham, on a map, no longer appeared as a ribbon of settlement."